PepeTube.mobi
Welcome
Login / Register

Body of Swiss climber Ueli Steck arrives in Kathmandu

Thanks! Share it with your friends!

URL

You disliked this video. Thanks for the feedback!

Sorry, only registred users can create playlists.
URL


Added by Admin in Pepe Today
35 Views

Description

'Swiss Machine' climber Ueli Steck dies on Mount Everest after 'slipping and falling 3,000 ft - severing his body into bits and pieces'

  • Ueli Steck, 40, was discovered on the Nuptse Face of the mountain today
  • He died after falling 3,280 ft down the mountain and severing his body
  • Steck planned to climb Everest and Lhotse in Nepal for the first time since 1963
  • He climbed the world's highest mountain without extra oxygen in 2012

 

 

 
 

Swiss climber Ueli Steck was killed in a mountaineering accident on Mount Everest in Nepal, expedition organisers say. Dinesh Bhattarai, director general at the Department of Tourism said: 'He skidded off about 1,000 metres from camp'

Famed Swiss climber Ueli Steck was killed in a mountaineering accident on Mount Everest in Nepal after slipping and falling 3,000 ft, severing his body into bits and pieces expedition organisers have said. 

Mingma Sherpa of the Seven Summit Treks says Steck was killed near Camp II of Everest on Sunday morning.

Other mountaineers have claimed he died after slipping and falling 3,280 ft down the mountain, severing his body into bits and pieces on the rough terrain, according to The Himalyan Times.

 

His body parts have been recovered from Nuptse Face and was taken to Lukla, where the only airport in the Mount Everest area is located.

Ang Tsering Sherpa, head of the Nepal Mountaineering Association said: 'Today morning, he had an accident on the Nuptse wall and died. It seems he slipped.' 

Dinesh Bhattarai, director general at the Department of Tourism said: 'He skidded off about 1,000 metres from [Everest] camp two early morning on Sunday. Other climbers ascending Everest saw him and asked for his rescue.' 

The 40-year-old Steck was one of the most-renowned mountaineers of his generation.  

Steck's death is the first of the season on the world's highest mountain.  

His body parts (above on the helipad) were flown to the Teaching Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal this afternoon
 

His body parts (above on the helipad) were flown to the Teaching Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal this afternoon

Nepalese volunteers and friends of Steck carry his body at a hospital in Kathmandu
 

Nepalese volunteers and friends of Steck carry his body at a hospital in Kathmandu

Steck, 40, was one of the most-renowned mountaineers of his generation and his death marks the first of the season on Mount Everest. He posted on Facebook from Basecamp earlier this week
 

Steck, 40, was one of the most-renowned mountaineers of his generation and his death marks the first of the season on Mount Everest. He posted on Facebook from Basecamp earlier this week

He posted on Facebook for the last time on April 26, when he wrote: 'Quick Day from Basecamp up to 7000m and back. I love it its such a great place here. 

'I still believe in active aclimatisation. This is way more effective then spending Nights up in the Altitude!'  

Steck was planning to climb Mount Everest and Mount Lohtse in the same expedition, the second time anyone would have travelled by the 'Hornbein route'.

The mountaineer climbed Everest without supplemental oxygen in 2012 and was planning on trekking up the world's highest mountain and nearby Mount Lohtse. It would have been the second time someone had attempted the route since 1963
 

The mountaineer climbed Everest without supplemental oxygen in 2012 and was planning on trekking up the world's highest mountain and nearby Mount Lohtse. It would have been the second time someone had attempted the route since 1963

Mr Steck, right, pictured with Sherpa Tenjing in Lukla last week
 

Mr Steck, right, pictured with Sherpa Tenjing in Lukla last week

The path was first trekked by Tom Hornbein and Willi Unsoeld in 1963. 

Steck had been preparing for the climb for four months.  

He had climbed Everest without supplemental oxygen in 2012 with Tenji Sherpa. 

Before he set off on his expedition, he wrote on Facebook: 'My mind is already in Nepal. I am super motivated. 

'I think being in the mountains is the best thing in life. Once you are out you are free and can do what you like to do.'

Steck had been preparing for the climb for four months. He almost died in 2007 while climbing the Annapurna south face in Nepal. He reached the summit in 2013 and received the Piolet d'Or the next year
 

Steck had been preparing for the climb for four months. He almost died in 2007 while climbing the Annapurna south face in Nepal. He reached the summit in 2013 and received the Piolet d'Or the next year

He broke his first speed record in 2007 when he climbed the North face of the Eiger, then broke his own record in 2008 and 2015.  

In 2013 he achieved the first solo climb of the Annapurna south face in Nepal after almost losing his life in a fall there in 2007. 

For that he received the 'Piolet d'Or' - considered the Oscar of mountaineering - the following year.

He broke his first speed record when he scaled the North face of the Eiger in Switzerland in 2007. He broke his own record in 2008 and 2015
 

He broke his first speed record when he scaled the North face of the Eiger in Switzerland in 2007. He broke his own record in 2008 and 2015

Steck wrote on Facebook: 'I think being in the mountains is the best thing in life. Once you are out you are free and can do what you like to do'
 
Pictured, Steck completes some pull-ups on Everest
 
 

Steck wrote on Facebook: 'I think being in the mountains is the best thing in life. Once you are out you are free and can do what you like to do.' Pictured, Steck completes some pull-ups on Everest

In 2015, Steck decided to climb all 82 peaks in the Alps higher than 13,100 feet traveling between mountains by foot, bike and paraglider only. 

He completed the feat in 62 days, helping cement his reputation as the 'Swiss Machine.'

Steck hit global headlines in 2013 when he and two other Western climbers traded blows with a group of furious Nepali guides over a climbing dispute on Mount Everest.

Last month, Steck told Swiss daily Tages-Anzeiger that he considers himself an 'outsider' in the mountaineering world. He said athletic achievement is more important to him than adventure
 

Last month, Steck told Swiss daily Tages-Anzeiger that he considers himself an 'outsider' in the mountaineering world. He said athletic achievement is more important to him than adventure

 
'Swiss machine' mountaineer's interview days before tragic death

 
 
 
 
Loaded: 0%
Progress: 0%
0:00
Previous
Play
Skip
Mute
 
Current Time0:00
/
Duration Time0:25
Fullscreen
Need Text
 
 

An angry Steck swore never to return to Everest, telling a Swiss website that his 'trust (was) gone'.

The brawl shocked the mountaineering community, causing a damaging rift between Western climbers and the often lowly-paid Nepalese guides who are essential for commercial expeditions to the crowded summit.

Steck said in an interview last month with Swiss daily Tages-Anzeiger that he considers himself an 'outsider' in the mountaineering scene because athletic achievement is more important to him than adventure.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4459912/Swiss-climber-Ueli-Steck-killed-Mount-Everest.html#ixzz4fmnCp0AP 
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Post your comment

Comments

Be the first to comment
RSS